Can We Be Angry at Prodigals? The Frustrated Compassion of Jesus (TGC)

Recently, while reading Luke 15 and the parable of the prodigal son, I began to reflect on the character of the father. Preaching on this parable tends to highlight the father’s loving welcome, his compassion and grace upon both sons, his willingness to come out to greet both sons at great cost in terms of social shame and dishonor, and his great joy at receiving the lost son. This is right and good. But I think it’s worth considering Luke 15:20:

And he arose and came to his father. But while he was still a long way off, his father saw him and felt compassion, and ran and embraced him and kissed him.

We often focus on the fact the son was a long way off when the father saw him. The father was sitting there, waiting, hoping for his wandering son to come home. The welcoming heart precedes the prodigal’s repentance. Long before you ever thought to come back, God was there, waiting to run to you. So with our own prodigals, we wait with open arms, ready to receive with joy all who come in repentance seeking grace.

But what is the father allowed to feel in the meantime? There’s danger in reading too much into a parable beyond the plot as it’s developed, or delving deeply into the psyches of characters whose existence spans about 20 verses. Still, it says in the text the father saw him and then he “felt compassion,” moved to action.

What did the father feel before he saw the son coming home? Can we imagine him frustrated and angry? Are we to suppose during the months, or even years, the prodigal is away the father is only and solely feeling a mild, welcoming compassion? Is there no place for a holy frustration at destructive choices he sees his beloved child making? Is there no place for hurt, for grief at the pain of rejection in the midst of his unrelenting love and mercy? Are these feelings allowed for gracious Christians?

You can read the rest of my article at The Gospel Coalition.

Soli Deo Gloria

2 thoughts on “Can We Be Angry at Prodigals? The Frustrated Compassion of Jesus (TGC)

  1. Hi Derek
    Who knows?
    All we know and what really matters God is that when reunion is possible He is far more concerned about love & reconciliation.
    That’s why Jesus makes this the point of the story.
    He is able to contain (if they exist) any “negative” feelings towards us – The cross demonstrates this.
    Blessings.
    Lewis.

  2. Hi Derek
    Who knows?
    All we know and what really matters is that when reunion is possible He is far more concerned about love & reconciliation.
    That’s why Jesus makes this the main point of the story.
    He is able to contain (if they exist) any “negative” feelings towards us – The cross demonstrates this.
    Blessings.
    Lewis.

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