Is it Okay to Pastor the “Small” Problems Too?

single personLast week I had a piece published at the Gospel Coalition on the subject of gluttony, though not the typical gluttony of excess, but rather the gluttony of nice things. I also noted the temptation to that sort of thing present in craft beer, organic, kale, etc. foodie trends that are popular (and that I mostly enjoy!). Well, while it was largely well-received, there were a few nay-sayers.

Why the protest? Well, a few reasons, but the one that really got my attention was the challenge along the lines “You know, you really ought to be dealing with the bigger issue here which is the gluttony of excess. You sit here nit-picking foodies and people who care about their health, but you don’t go after the real obesity epidemic connected to fast food a cruddy foods.” Or again, one that came up a couple of times, “This is the kind of sin that only wealthy, American hipster types with disposable cash would care about.”

What do we say to this? Well, my first retort in a couple of cases was the all-too-obvious “methinks the lady doth protest too much” factor. When you step on someone’s idol–organic or not–they tend to react defensively. But we’ll leave that sort of ad hominem, though likely accurate, argument to the side. Pushing deeper, my question then becomes, “Okay, say the gluttony of excess is the bigger problem. Also, let’s concede that the gluttony of daintiness is the sort of thing that only a middle-class, hipster kid with disposable cash is tempted by. What of it?”

In essence, my question becomes, “Is it okay to pastor the small sins too?”

There is a sort of pragmatism that I find can infect our thinking about pastoral care, preaching, or the witness of the church in these cases. We have this sense that, if the sin isn’t “big” enough, or effect enough people, then we shouldn’t waste our time thinking about it, or addressing it in print. I think this is, quite frankly, nonsense. As a pastor and preacher of the Word of God, I have responsibility to deal any and all issues, big or small, that tempt or draw our hearts away from the Lord. If I only ever addressed the “biggest issues”, I’d probably have to spend every week preaching about sex and money and never get to anything else the Bible addresses, leaving large swathes of the human heart un-addressed.

Beyond that, I have responsibility of thinking of my context. I happen to pastor in an area that has a good chunk of upper middle-class, hipster types with disposable incomes who deal with these sorts of temptations. Am I allowed to address a pastoral word to them? Or do only the majority of Americans, or maybe global citizens need God’s Word addressed to their hearts? Obviously, the question is answered as soon as it is asked. If I followed the logic of only addressing the issues that the majority of people face, I’d never address the challenges that employers, or business owners have, since the majority of people only struggle with the challenges of being an employee. We could follow that logic out in a number of different directions.

The one danger that I would say that pastors need to beware of is using some of these “smaller” issues, or more specific issues, that ding less of your congregation, in order to preach hard on sins that most of your people don’t struggle with. That is a real danger and that’s been at the heart of some of the challenges of inconsistency on the part of progressives on sexuality with respect to same-sex marriage. If you’re going to preach about same-sex sin, you better be challenging your congregation on fornication and divorce as well. And I suppose, if you’re going to talk about daintiness, you better address excess.

Still, that said, don’t be afraid to address the “small” sins. Somebody in your congregation probably struggles with them, others might be tempted by them, and often-times you don’t know the way addressing “smaller” issues will shape the way your people will respond to your preaching on the larger ones.

Soli Deo Gloria

4 thoughts on “Is it Okay to Pastor the “Small” Problems Too?

  1. Good word Derek. I appreciate as well the ” ” around the word small, for are we really going to say there are smaller things that separate us from a holy God and big things that separate us from a holy God, so just focus on the big things that do that? You’d think a conscientious person would want to address anything and every weight that hinders us from closer relationship with God. I agree as well that context (and in this case the context of who you are preaching to) is going to influence any sermon you preach – even on the very same text.

  2. I was pretty ruthless in a recent sermon in about moralistic consumerism, the idolatry of choice among Northern Virginia yuppies. It’s fine to be health-conscious but my gosh people really do make a religion out of it. Whatever leads to angsty slavery and not enjoyment of God is sin even when it looks good because it’s moralistic (cf Colossians 2).

  3. There are NO small sins. One “small sin” is enough to send us to hell.

    Our problem is that we don’t take ‘sin’ seriously. Our committing this, or that sin, is not the real problem.

    The real problem is that it (sin) is our condition.

    We are bound in sin. And we don’t want to freed from it. We don’t stop sinning because we don’t want to stop. Otherwise we would stop.

    We need a Savior. Not a self-help, tune-up meister.

  4. I do agree with all the ideas you have presented for your post.
    They’re really convincing and can certainly work.
    Still, the posts are too brief for starters. May you please
    lengthen them a little from next time? Thanks for the
    post.

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